Clothes and artifacts

The Arctic climate requires warm clothes that are water- and wind-proof. Sealskin holds all these qualities and has been the preferred material for thousands of years in the Arctic due to these qualities and its availability. It has been used for clothing as well as materials for tents, kayaks, blankets, carpets and rugs for houses and sledges.

When they travel by sea (kayaking), they put on as a great-coat over their common garment, a tuelik, i.e. a black, smooth seal’s hide, that keeps out water

David Crantz, 1767, The History of Greenland


Carving sealskin with the traditional women knife - the ulo © Mads Pihl

Carving sealskin with the ulo © Mads Pihl, Visit Greenland

Traditionally Inuit  women prepared the skins using the women’s knife ulo, and various stones were used to rub, scrape and soften the skin. Often hard skins were chewed soft. The ulo is an all-purpose knife still used in applications as diverse as skinning and cleaning animals, cutting a child’s hair, cutting food and, if necessary, trimming blocks of snow and ice used to build an igloo.

 

 

Today many of the steps in the tanning process and the conservation of skins are automated, but still demands manual work and handling. Besides conserving the skin, the purpose is also to keep the natural look and feel. New techniques in tanning, dyeing and scalping of skins make them so thin that they can be sewn into lovely evening gowns or beautiful tops. Below: Men at work in a tannery © Great Greenland Furhouse

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Seal skinns Great Greenland Furhouse

Most major villages in Greenland had until recently a sewing workshop where sealskins were made into different garments and artifacts. Due to the 2009 EU seal ban, Great Greenland Furhouse had to close its last sewing workshop in 2016. The effects of the seal ban have been devastating for household economies in many of the villages in Greenland, especially those where few or no alternative income options exist.

Mersortarfik sewing workshop in Ilulissat in Greenland © Mads Pihl, Visit Greenland

Mersortarfik sewing workshop, Ilulissat, Greenland © Mads Pihl, Visit Greenland

Now as in the past, essential parts of the Greenlandic national dress are made from sealskin, like the footwear – the kamiks – and the trousers. The dress is used for special occasions like the national celebration, religious holidays, and first day of kindergarten and school.

2016 Confirmation in Nanortalik, Greenland © Mads Pihl, Visit Greenland

2016 Confirmation in Nanortalik, Greenland © Mads Pihl, Visit Greenland

The outstanding qualities of seal skin have not gone unnoticed by fashion designers, both in hunting countries like Greenland, Iceland and Norway and also internationally. Their products have supplied the market with high fashion, luxury clothing.

© Mads Pihl, Visit Greenland
© Mads Pihl, Visit Greenland
© Mads Pihl, Visit Greenland
© Mads Pihl, Visit Greenland
© Great Greenland Furhouse
© Great Greenland Furhouse

Almost every part of whales and seals can be used either directly or made into another product. The baleen from baleen whales, a plankton filtering structure found in their mouths, was used to make corsets, carriage springs, fishing poles, whips and umbrella ribs in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Whale-bone could be moulded, with heat and pressure, into complex shapes used for a variety of luxury items, like handles cups and ladles, twisted walking sticks, the handles of Samurai swords, and hair combs. Jewellery and artifacts (decorations, knife handles, walking sticks) are still made from marine mammals baleen, bones and skins.

Slippers © aarhus grønlands hus
Slippers © aarhus grønlands hus
Necklace © Mads Pihl, Visit Greenland
Necklace © Mads Pihl, Visit Greenland
Handbags © aarhus grønlands hus
Handbags © aarhus grønlands hus

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